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Three Feet or So: Music and Creating Positive Change in the World

by Kerry Dexter /
Kerry Dexter's picture
Aug 21, 2017 / 0 comments

Unsettling times, times of uncertainty, times of change -- these can bring about fear, and fear's twin, anger. Such times may bring about despair, frustration, discouragement. It is also possible, though, to live in such times with hope, and with courage. The music I offer you in this series of posts is meant to help with that. Careful how you go, indeed. Take heart and take courage, and keep music as your good companion.

Oo Roo, Uluru: a Trek In the Australian Outback

OO ROO, ULURU
The Australian saying "see ya later" is often "Oo Roo."

Stephane Alexandre's picture

The things we carry when we travel: Our ethnicity. Our dreams. Our hopes.

My hair looks different, my backpack is always open, and I have a medium brown complexion. I'm sun-kissed. I am kissed by the sun. Now, if you live in Boston or in Medford, where I go to Tufts, and you saw me walking down the street, you'd probably make nothing of it. 

I was waiting for the ferry from Montevideo to Buenos Aires with my friends a few weeks ago. A long way from Boston. I was charging my phone when a kid walked up to me and asked in Spanish "Why are you brown?"

"You're brown all over. You look like soil."

The Art of Road Tripping, Part 3: Noticing Things

In this world of continual distractions, those with the ability to be present enough to notice things have an unfair advantage. My drive from Utah to Minnesota has taught me that I can have that advantage, too. All I have to do is remember to breathe, pause, and focus on one thing at a time. A long road trip is the perfect place to practice this sort of thinking. 

Izabel Antle's picture

Travel Bloggers Share Their Best Misadventures on the Road

Traveling is an amazing experience that will more likely than not leave you with stories to share in the future, but sometimes things don’t go quite as planned. Behind the photos of picturesque landscapes, white sandy beaches, exotic street scenes, or quaint European towns, every traveller has their share of travel mishaps. 

Travel Bloggers Share Their Best Misadventures on the Road

I caught the bus to Sydney

I caught the bus to Sydney, one morning last week. Canberra to Sydney. A taxi pick up at 5 AM. I have a penchant for being early. Although it is only a five minute ride to the bus depot, I bring a book and make sure I am there on time. Well, before time actually, but it gives me time for that pre-journey "P" (there are three Ps in Peppinck, and that is about right for the journey!). Perhaps one aboard the swaying bus, and as the terminus for our journey is Central station, there are plenty of facilities there!

Nicholas Jubber's picture

The Tanner’s Tale: Life in the Medina of Fez

It’s the smell that hits you first: a ureic stench so thick it feels like something solid is foraging up your nostrils. Tourists are given sprigs of mint or rosemary, like the nosegays carried by Renaissance gentlefolk. But if you want to be accepted by the tanners, you have to go unprotected. I’m turning up for my first day as an apprentice tanner, in the old city of Fez, with nothing to filter out the odours. 

Dr. Jessie Voigts's picture

A Day in the Life of a Not-So-Ordinary Composer

So, you think you had a busy day? Consider what a typical working day might be like for composer Megan Cavallari. Start with the fact that Cavallari is one of only a very small handful of women who have established themselves as major creative artists in the professional music industry. But not even most of the men can point to a resume as diverse, eclectic, and impressive as this diminutive Jewish-Italian Philadelphia native: more than a 100 film scores as performer, arranger, conductor, or composer; the official composer of the L.A.

Alsace-Lorraine: Anything but Plain

Blood on the station floor. Mine! Yes, another fall on the escalator as I hurried to catch the high-speed German ICE (Inter City Express) train in Amsterdam’s Centraal Station. Heavy bag deciding to go south, me following. A bang on the head and a cut finger. Police there in an instant, tissues materialised to stem the dripping, wanting me to sit and calm down … and the train to leave in two minutes. And you know how German trains leave as the second hand hits the Twelve. No, not dizzy, shaken but okay ..

Rotterdam: Not the Poor Cousin

I suppose that if you are “going Dutch,” and you are lulled by the lure of Amsterdam Gouda, Haarlem, or even The Hague, all gables and canals, then Rotterdam may come as a bit of a disappointment.

Well, fooled be you.

Like going to see the Mona Lisa and walking past the Pissarro, without much of a glance.

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